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in the united states because of the human rights violations alleged in the complaint. they sued the defendants for their role in these human rights violations in u.s. general personal jurisdiction of our courts. abouts nothing unusual suing a tortfeasor in our -- >> may i ask you about the statement you just made? personal jurisdiction was raised as a defense, right? >> personal jurisdiction was raised as an affirmative defense, but not raised in a motion to dismiss. >> and so your position is it was waived? >> yes. >> but it was not adjudicated. is there -- >> it was not adjudicated in this case. our position, it was waived when it was not raised in a rule 12 motion. >> what effects that commenced in the united states or that are closely related to the united states exist between what happened here and what happened in nigeria? >> the only connection between the events in nigeria and the united states is that the plaintiffs are now living in the united states and have asylum because of those events, and the defendants are here. there's no other connection between the events that took place in
had. france looks a lot more like the united states, frankly. the western hat name in the last decade is also true you do see it. i haven't done this kind of analysis because as data aren't available to me for other countries. but all the normal indicators of how well those economies are performing say that they've been underperforming in much the same way the united states has been underperforming for the last decade, which it can lends credence to the notion that the this is about is globalization and information technology in the ship and the relative value of intangible assets is tangible assets. >> isn't the real point of difference in the health care you are making quick >> there is a big difference in health care. you're right. [inaudible] >> mind this kind of two-pronged two-pronged -- [inaudible] [inaudible] [inaudible] >> well, on the question of women's earnings, yes, the fact that women are the primary caretakers of children in society as compared to their husbands and a lot of women with children don't have husbands, is certainly a factor. and i felt the biggest factor he
education and the contacted bashar. two years almost to the day later the ambassador to the united states called me up and was also a friend and also an academic. dean of computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said, it's on. and i had forgotten about this whole thing. and i said, what's on? and the set to well, the president wants to meet with you and so common with him in may and june of that year extensively, it's viewed his wife and many other syrian officials. >> what was the first meeting like? >> well, after the pleasantries in after i explained why i wanted to do this my first substantive sentence to him was, mr. president, you know i'm not an apologist for syria. of writing this book on you, and of going to criticize you. and he said, that's fine. i know you will criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and in the past you criticize my father's policy, but you're always fair and objective. then i told him, one of the worst things you never did. >> what's that? >> you let it be known the like phil collins music, the rock star from england.
, the ambassador, the syrian ambassador of the united states the time called me a pen was also a friend and academic in the past, computer science at damascus university prior to becoming ambassador. he said david, it's on. i'd forgotten about this will mean. i said what is on? he said well, the president was to meet with you. and so i met with him in may and june of that you're extensively. i interviewed his wife in many other syrian officials. >> host: what was the first baby might? >> well, after the pleasantries and after i explained why wanted to do those, my first substantive substantive sentence to him was mr. president, you know i'm not in politics for s-sierra. you know i'm going to read this but can criticize you. he said that's fine. i know you'll criticize me. i know that because i'm not perfect and i know in the past you criticized my father's policy, but you are always fair and objective from their point of view. and then i told him, you know, mr. president, one of the worst things you ever did? with that? said he let it be known that you like phil collins music, the rocks
in an interview the united states both economically and militarily and also in terms of its overall influence, really is as strong as it's ever been. he said this on february 21st, 2012 in case you want to pinpoint at least that statement. tom, do you agree with the assertion that right now or in 2012 the united states is as strong as it's ever been? >> that depends, david come if you were speaking about strong, relative in to houma? and in what area. i think there is no question in terms of influence. and on the global stage where the country that is most emulated in the world. but it is possible as mohammed said the world's cleanest dirty shirt also. and so come on a really prefer to think about american strength and i have to answer this question in a little bit of detail in terms of what are the things that have made us strong to start with? and i would argue that we had a formula for success in this country and was built on five pillars. one was educate our people love to and beyond what the technology was so we could get the most out of it. so it was universal primary education, the fac
the united states economy. the price and economic impact would be much greater if these occurred. we hope that this paper which is a departure from the focus of most papers on the consequences of a nuclear iran or a nuclear capable iran will trigger a new discussion and enable an expanded debate on the topic. i would like to introduce michael, the foreign policy director of the bpc, a former oil analyst to boot. he directed this effort and will review some of the key findings. he will introduce our very distinguished panel. mike. >> thank you, senator. thank you everyone for coming. as the senator said, the purpose of this report is really to trigger a debate. we are not suggesting that we have all of the answers, but we wanted to introduce a new dimension to the debate about iran about preventing a nuclear iran. we are not -- focusing on the economics, we are not suggesting the economic issues should drive united states policy one way or another. but it has definitely come up in the debate. it has been raised, certainly in terms of let us say about the impact on sanctions and military, s
, so is mr. mondale's. they saved the life of the president of the united states. i thought that was a cheap shot telling the american people to try to divide class, rich and poor. but the big question, it isn't whether mrs. ferraro is doing well. i think they are depog pretty well. i know barbara and i are doing well. and it is darn sure mr. mondale is doing well with $1.4 million. but the question is, are the tax codes fair? the answer is, the rich are paying 6% more on taxes and the poor are getting a better break. they went to the ethics committee. they went to change the trust. the trust has been revealed. and i was sure glad to see that i had paid 42% of my gross income in taxes. >> are you really a texan? >> i am really a texan. i may have noted she has a new good accountant. i would like to get his name and phone number. i think i paid too much in the way of taxes. and residents, mr. boyd, legal residence for voting is very different. the domicile, they call it, very different than the house. they say you are living in the vice president's house. therefore you don't
went into the united states senate in 2001 with the biggest surpluses in the history of the united states and six years later, left with massive deficits. during his time in the senate, national debt went up by $16,000 every second and in an earlier debate, he conceded spending was a problem when he was in the senate. we also have people who know how to work together. as a nonpartisan mayor in richmond, i worked to cut crime, build schools, and grow the economy, and as a governor in a tough time, we worked to win all kinds of accolades for the state. my opponent, when he was governor, said his job was to knock democrats soft teeth down their whiny throats and took a similar position in the senate, siding against compromise efforts led by then virginia's senior senator john warner. we need to join together to move forward and that's what i'll do as your next united states senator. >> mr. allen, your opening statement. >> thank you, bob, and thank you all for listening and watching this debate. folks, i envision a much better future than what we're having to endure these days and tha
of the united states ought not accept any soviet control over eastern europe. we ought to deal with each of these countries separately. we ought to pursue strategies with each of them, economic and the rest, that help them pull away from their dependence upon the soviet union. where the soviet union has acted irresponsibly, as they have in many of those countries, especially, recently, in poland, i believe we ought to insist that western credits extended to the soviet union bear the market rate. make the soviets pay for their irresponsibility. that is a very important objective -- to make certain that we continue to look forward to progress toward greater independence by these nations and work with each of them separately. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i'm not going to continue trying to respond to these repetitions of the falsehoods that have already been stated here. but with regard to whether mr. mondale would be strong, as he said he would be, i know that he has a commercial out where he's appearing on the deck of the nimitz and watching the f- 14's take off. and that's an
this serious occur in an administration and have a president of the united states in a situation like this say he didn't know? a president must know these things. i don't know which is worse, not knowing or knowing and not stopping it. and what about the mining of the harbors in nicaragua which violated international law? this has hurt this country, and a president's supposed to command. >> mr. president, your rebuttal. >> yes. i have so many things there to respond to, i'm going to pick out something you said earlier. you've been all over the country repeating something that, i will admit, the press has also been repeating-that i believed that nuclear misses could be fired and then called back. i never, ever conceived of such a thing. i never said any such thing. in a discussion of our strategic arms negotiations, i said that submarines carrying ssiles and airplanes carrying missiles we more conventional- type weapons, not as destabilizing as the land-based missiles, and that they were also weapons that -- or carriers-that if they were sent out and there was a change, you could call them back
.d.'s are coming from the united states, in our most complete engineering schools. that is a recipe for disaster. that is a recipe for disaster. we do not ever talk about it. we're just letting the thing unraveled. what about best new engineering schools, which you will be hearing about in a few days, in dallas, and they have a great school, but guess what -- i asked them onetime how many people they have from china, and this university right here, 2000, added to the top. >> this is an example of how we need to modernize our immigration policy and how we need to change education policy alice well. immigration policy is based on family relationships. it is not based on economic considerations, skills and knowledge. while we need to revitalize education for americans, we need to recognize the extent to which people are coming to america to learn we need to do what we need to do to keep them in america. >> this is our core problem. there trillions of connections in the brain called neurons. they start down at age 6 when they start public school. kids at a school soared like eagles, got college scho
legislature. but i'm also a serious guy. i think the presidency of the united states is a very serious office, and i think we have to address these issues in a very serious way. so i hope and expect that i will be liked by the people of this country as president of the united states. i certainly hope i will be liked by them on the 8th of november. [laughter] but i also think it's important to be somebody who is willing to make those tough choices. now, we have just heard two or three times from the vice president he's not going to raise taxes. i repeat, within days after you made that pledge, you broke it. you said, well, maybe as a last resort we'll do it. and you supported legislation this year that's involved tax increases not once, but twice. so that pledge isn't realistic, and i think the vice president knows it. i think the people of this country know it. the fact of the matter is that the next president of the united states is going to have to go to the white house seriously, he is going to have to work with the congress seriously. he can't turn to the congress and blame them for the f
is the chief executive officer of the united states. whoever the next president is, they need to demonstrate extraordinary presidential leadership. they need to use the power of the presidency to go to the american people, as ross perot did in 1992, to build a case that we are on a burning platform, to help them understand that everything has to be on the table, to provide principles and a framework for action, and to call the first three words of the constitution "we the people" to work with the president to solve the problem, because if you do not keep the economy strong, everything will suffer over time -- job opportunities, domestic tranquility. >> did you feel in 1992 and 1996, that we can get out of our deficits, and we ran four years of surpluses, prior to 9/11 and other things that happened in the last decade. did you think we had solved our problems? >> no, we were just lucky where weaver going through a good time. now we are any time of bad luck. i would really impressed if our president would take this issue right now and explain to the american people what he is going to do, beca
am running for the united states senate. to change the want leadership in washington. we can change that. that is why i am running for the senate. i want to pass a balanced budget. i am not your usual politician. i'm not one of the good old boys pay ed i will make this tough decisions in the united states senate. i will roll up my sleeves, work hard for you, and i will fight for you. >> now the opening statement from bob kerrey. >> thank you. i love nebraska. i always have and i always will. i was born here in lincoln. i left nebraska and went to war and came home, and i recovered from illness in the lincoln. i started a business that employed more than 700 people. i served as your governor, balancing our budget, and i left after four years and went back to business. i served as your son that -- as your senator, and again we balance our budget. i am a candidate for congress for the senate because congress needs to change, and i will fight to make that happen. i have never had and never will be a cookie cutter politician. i never have and never will be anything other than someone who
. a lot of people i've heard about the trade conflict between the united states and china on solar panels. this is an interesting prism to view the chinese economy more broadly because this is a classic case of china really pushing hard for big innovation and winding up with little innovation that doesn't get them to where they want to go and part of china's innovation policy is targeting strategic emerging industries. these are the industries that beijing thinks will be the industry's of the future. the biggest is green energy including solar and wind and electric vehicles and other green energy technologies so they have unleashed a lot of funding to support grain energy innovation. most of that funding has created instead of mosul products continuing the same old model process innovation which is making the products created in the west faster and cheaper and therefore using that to take away some of the u.s. market share. they've been very successful doing that on solar energy. china is making solar panels at lower prices than other countries around the world and therefore they are subs
for the united states senate? >> i'm run ling for the same reason i wanted to represent molakai when i was 27 years old. on the counsel making life better for seniors meant fix it is drinking fountain and installing ceiling fans. as mayor it meant capping taxes so people could afford to stay in their home even when property value skyrocketed. as governor it meant creating a robotics program so twins at a high school would major in engineering. as senator making life better means protecting social security and medicare for future generations. we have to cannot to invest in healthcare, education, national security and infrastructure while working to regain our financial strength as a nation. two years ago i was invited to be a founding member of a governor's counsel at the bipartisan policy center washington where i worked with former republican and democrat governors on issues important to the state and nation. unlike my opponent i have a track record of working in a bipartisan fashion to make life better for the people of hawaii. i ask for your vote so i can continue my work as hawaii's next
look for in the president of the united states of america. i'm proud that important military figures who are supporting me in this race, former chairman of the joint chiefs of staff john shalikashvili, just yesterday, general eisenhower's son, general john eisenhower, endorsed me, general admiral william crown, general tony mcbeak, who ran the air force war so effectively for his father -- all believe i would make a stronger commander in chief. and they believe it because they know i would not take my eye off of the goal, osama bin laden. unfortunately, he escaped in the mountains of tora bora. we had him surrounded. but we didn't use american forces, the best trained in the world, to go kill him. the president relied on afghan warlords and he outsourced that job too. that's wrong. >> new question, two minutes, senator kerry." colossal misjudgments." what colossal misjudgments, in your opinion, has president bush made in these areas? >> well, where do you want me to begin? first of all, he made the misjudgment of saying to america that he was going to build a true alliance, that he w
to iran in terms of views of the united states. so there's a very different dynamic on the ground among libyan youth. notwithstanding what we're seeing in the news. um, and i thought the uprising in benghazi was hugely a success, important to think about when 30,000 people rose up a few weekends ago to throw out islamist militias. the population once again taking control of the situation where a dysfunctional government wasn't able to. and i found the intervention very interesting because in many ways i think the main bogeyman was not the islamist militias, but the fear of what the 30,000 would do if things got much worse. which brings up another thing that i should have said in the introductory remarks, the arab spring, the dynamic, we view it as people against regimes, but just as important is regimes against regimes and people against people, and i'm happy to talk about those in the q&a, but it's not just people against regimes. following benghazi, a well known libyan academic said something which stuck with me. he said libyans have no idea where they're going, but they're going to g
. thinking has been around for several hundred years. under the united states constitution the ability to create money as part of the united states prompted the united states constitution. forever 200 years a lot of that has been outsourced to the private-sector, today least 90% of our money supply so to speak is produced by the commercial banking industry. i am not even mentioning some of the other parts of the financial services industry. for the last nearly 100 years, the fed has been involved and not outsourcing. and the lender of last resort is there to support the banking industry. and for the last 75 plus years we have the fdic providing another part of the federal safety net, to make the banking industry the commercial banking industry much more robust. so to me this is all about the safety net. but it is also time to roll back the safety net, because when we think about the money supply, what we used to pay for things, that is where we have the safety net here. it also need to recognize the the united states dollar is holding be fed currency of the world. many of our transacti
muslims, not have them isolate the united states of america. i know i can do a better job in iraq. i have a plan to have a summit with all of the allies, something this president has not yet achieved, not yet been able to do to bring people to the table. we can do a better job of training the iraqi forces to defend themselves, and i know that we can do a better job of preparing for elections. all of these, and especially homeland security, which we'll talk about a little bit later. >> mr. president, you have a 90- second rebuttal. >> i, too, thank the university of miami, and say our prayers are with the good people of this state, who've suffered a lot. september the 11th changed how america must look at the world. and since that day, our nation has been on a multi-pronged strategy to keep our country safer. we pursued al qaida wherever al qaida tries to hide. seventy-five percent of known al qaida leaders have been brought to justice. the rest of them know we're after them. we've upheld the doctrine that said if you harbor a terrorist, you're equally as guilty as the terrorist. and the t
at the united states because as you have said that has happened too often in the past. that tragedy should occur we have to step in without any margin for error, enough time for preparation to take over the responsibilities for the biggest job in the world, that of running this great country of ours, to take over the awesome responsibility for commanding the nuclear weaponry that this country has. the debate tonight is a debate about a presidential decision that has to be made by you. the stakes could not be higher. >> moderator: senator bentsen question for you and you have two minutes to respond. what bothers people was not so much for qualification, but your split on policy with governor dukakis. he has said that he does not want to clone himself, but you disagree with him on some major issues, a that the in nicaragua conference, did the death penalty, gun-control among others. if you had to step into the presidency, whose agenda would you pursue, yours or his? >> i am delighted to respond to that question. because we agree on so many things and in the best majority of the issues, we agree on
? >> you can't have the united states of america out there looking over his shoulder wondering whether his vice president is going to be supporting him. mrs. ferraro has quite a few differences with vice president mondale. and i understand it when she changed her position on gas tax. she voted to end the grain embargo. if they win, and i hope they don't, but if they l win, she will have to accommodate his views, but she will give the same kind of loyalty i'm giving president reagan. one, we are not that far apart on anything. he also knows i won't be talking about him to the press, or i won't be knifing in the back by leaking to make me look good and complicate the problems for the president of the united states. >> congresswoman ferraro, your opponent has served in the house of representatives, he's been ambassador to the united nations, ambassador to china, director of the central intelligence agency and now he's been vice president for four years. how does your three terms in the house of representatives stack up against experience like that? >> well, let me first say, i wasn't born at
think that i am running for the united states senate because it is my job to make sure that future generations that are coming up behind me have the same opportunities my family had. >> senator heller. >> i want to thank pbs, sponsors, and my opponent for being here this evening. i grew up with five brothers and sisters, and i raised four children of my own. i learned that an early stage it is more important to listen than it is to talk. that is what i have done. there are concerns about staying in their homes and keeping their jobs. senior citizens are worried about health care and about if the doctor is even going to accept medicare and the future. they are worried about this fiscal cliff. there are real issues with real people. i believe i will supply those real solutions. the result may be different, but i want to change the dialogue of this particular debate, a challenge for myself and my opponent for us to discuss these issues. we treat voters like adults. if we can do that, i think we will increase the dialogue here, and i think that is what nevada deserves. >> you have the
with the demonstrations themselves. but from their point of view, and this is, this is the dilemma from the united states too, this is the dilemma from the united states, you know, iran has exploited situations before. it has exploited situations before. there's the fear that it could exploit this one again, and that is why when we look, we do not know what to make of this group and where it stands on questions of democracy and participation and where it stands in its relationships with iran. we don't -- we have concerns about that. that are hampering our decision making. is there any other question? it's 12:00, we really need to close because of the cameras. so i guess i will say at this point thank you very much for coming. thank you to the panelists. [applause] and, again, we have a web site, www.mepc.org. i hope you visit it. [inaudible conversations] >> the middle east council wrapping up this discussion on foreign policy choices facing the next administration. we are going from this to the heritage foundation live now for a discussion on russia's role in the syrian civil war. this is just getting s
. it was a bit of a head fake after months of saying that we, the united states, should arm the syrian rebels. it was a clever word choice in this speech. what it actually said is, they should be armed, and then took a step back as to who should actually do it, how it would be done. he still does not like to answer the questions about what kinds of arms, who they would go to, and the risk that they could fall into extremist groups, or, frankly, the risks that they could threaten our ally, israel. the united states has been incredibly engaged and active in syria with the rebel forces under the president's leadership. it is an incredibly difficult situation. we have provided logistical support, communications support, worked with our allies, worked with turkey, tried to support -- provided as much humanitarian aid as we can, but anybody who speaks to the u.s. ambassador on this question -- still the calculation is providing support from the united states into the rebels' hands at this time would have a very uncertain outcome. we are working very hard with the rebel forces, and clearly, as the p
poverty which is one-fifth of what the united states does. and they have that rate because they have serious social welfare state, a serious social welfare network. and before we talk about moving more away from that and more towards giving a greater role to the market in our society, we need too seriously address what is clearly one, not the only, but one very important component of why finland outperforms the united states on educational measures. >> so, i will say when i came back from a trip to finland people want to have school in evanston, they should probably move to finland because it is quite a different social contact that they have created there. so i don't actually, we speak in the education debate, i was not making it, to make clear, i think in general society, this is a huge problem and how think about this and talk about it. but within education i think there's great deal of attention to poverty. they are serve has been this morning. i think on all sides, dislike debate is a lot more common ground about poverty than you would know from the rhetoric. >> quick last word
department and ultimately the president of the united states and the security means nobody is ever held responsible in any company. he wouldn't know who made the decision not to send troops and anyone working for a government overseas needs to have our full protection and care of government behind them. that is an abject failure, i hear you speaking about it and addressing it. >> guest: mitt romney commented yesterday that this is part of his foreign policy speech that he laid out in virginia. >> host: let's play the clip now. >> they are expressions of a larger struggle that is playing out across the middle east, a region that is now in the midst of the most profound of people in a century. in the fall onto this trouble can be seen clearly in benghazi itself. the attack on our conflict they are on september 11, 2012, was likely the work of forces affiliated with those that attacked our homeland on september 11, 2001. this latest assault can be blamed on the reprehensible video. despite the administration's attempts to convince us of that for so long. the administration has finally conc
of the united states, alan, i would order the secretary of the treasury to immediately buy up the bad home loan mortgages in america and renegotiate at the new value of those homes, at the diminished value of those homes and let people be able to make those payments and stay in their homes. is it expensive? yes. but we all know, my friends, until we stabilize home values in america, we're never going to start turning around and creating jobs and fixing our economy. and we've got to give some trust and confidence back to america. i know how the do that, my friends. and it's my proposal. it's not senator obama's proposal, it's not president bush's proposal. but i know how to get america working again, restore our economy and take care of working americans. thank you. >> senator, we have one minute for a discussion here. obviously, the powers of the treasury secretary have been greatly expanded. the most powerful officer in the cabinet now. hank paulson says he won't stay on. who do you have in mind to appoint to that very important post? senator mccain? >> not you, tom. >> no, with good reason. >
paul ryan and i will become the next president and vice president of the united states. [applause] we take america to two very different places and that is clear by virtue of what you have heard over the last two debates and you will hear over the last one as well. the president will put an america in place that has about $20 trillion in debt, killing the american dream for your kids. if i become president, i will take the action to make sure we kept our federal spending, we limit federal spending as a percentage of our total economy, and we finally get america on track to a balanced budget. [applause] if president obama were reelected, is spending plan and is borrowing and the death of that borrowing will cost -- cause not only high income people pyrotechnical small but, you will see middle income people in this country facing $4,000 more in taxes. when i become president of the united states, i will lower taxes for the middle-class and on small businesses who need a real break. [applause] he made it clear as well in the last couple debates that he is reelected, we will have obama ca
in the united states. [laughter] besides those two. it is a bizarre and unfortunate fact i think. but those are help interesting facts about the supreme court. but, frankly, i don't think they're very important. here's an important fact about the supreme court. there are five republicans and four democrats. i will speak for somewhat longer, but this is basically all you need to know. [laughter] if there's a take away here, i've gotten to the point early. there are five republicans and four democrats, and that really tells you much of what you need to know. and it is true that the justices wear robes because they're supposed to look all alike, and this was, you know, supposed to give the perception that they're all pretty much the same. but just as on the other side of first street, the united states congress is deeply divided, according to party, so was the united states supreme court. and this is a moment of real partisan division at the supreme court. and that is exemplified in case after case. why this moment is so important i think, you need to go back in history of the supreme court to
attack in the united states last year. talk about credibility. when this administration says all options are on the table, they send all these mixed signals. in order to solve this peacefully, you have to have the ayatollahs change their minds. look at where they are. it is because this administration has no credibility on this issue. this administration watered down sanctions. now we have been in place because of congress. the military option is not being viewed as credible. make sure we have credibility. under a romney administration, we will have credibility. >> incredible. do you think there is any possibility the entire world would have joined us? russia and china? these are the most crippling sanctions in the history of sanctions. period. when the governor is asked about it, he said, we have to keep the sanctions. you're going to go to war? the interesting thing, how are they going to prevent war? saye is nothing more they'd we should do than what we have already done. with regard to the ability of the united states to take action militarily, it is not in my purview to talk about c
in the united states. not just montana. they are competing with other emerging economies across the planet. we have to invest in our cells. -- in ourselves. i was astonished knowing the importance of a quality education when my opponent voted to slash grants and voted to increase the interest payments on student loans. that is how i went to school. that is how thousands of nevada at middle income families go to school. they depend on it. my opponent voted to slash. and he in -- he voted to double. as far as the department of education is concerned, at the lincoln county dinner, he very clearly said it is exactly what he would do, eliminate the department of education. it was picked up by "the times." >> thank you. >> that is not accurate but that is fine. i am not surprised she will continue with that. my opponent in 2010 voted against the loan program. it helped generations of americans get their education. she has to be careful with what she said. my wife is a schoolteacher. she taught school and works within school districts. she understands the importance of parents, teachers, and principl
, standing up in iran, with the backing of united states. that could have been counterproductive. as a result, the obama administration was pretty silent. at the time now where romney is going after him on that, i think there were a few areas where there were some significant differences, but on the whole, after you get through some of the angry rhetoric, there is a lot of agreement between obama and romney, one area of disagreement on arming the syrian rebels. another area of disagreement, how far will iran be able to go in its nuclear weapons capability, the capability of developing a bomb as opposed to actually having a bomb. and the third was on russia. he twice in a speech singled out vladimir putin as a basically a foe of the united states and he was doubling down on those controversial remarks. he made a few months ago, that russia was america's number one geostrategic foe. >> interesting on syria, i was listening to fareed zakaria, he noted the passive voice. we're wall for it as you mentioned, the foreign policy debate in two weeks. wolf blitzer, we'll talk next hour. i have more que
. >> the romneys had left the united states and went to mexico to avoid persecution, but it's also to pursue polygamy. >> narrator: miles romney had five wives and 30 children. >> they built a ranch and he's back in stone age conditions with no money. romney's father is now on the scene. that gets destroyed by guerrillas. they move back to california, poverty again. they build it back up. they move back to salt lake city. they build it back up. romney's whole history of a family is that they knocked us down, we built it back up. we didn't make a fortune; we made a bunch of fortunes. and they resented us for our success, but we kept coming back. that's romney's history. >> with someone with a name with romney you heard about the sufferings of your ancestors and their sacrifices and all they've done that you feel like, well, it's my turn now; i've got to pick up the baton and run with it. >> narrator: but mitt and his family rarely tell the story to outsiders. >> it's an incredible history. he can't talk about it because it involves polygamy. and so if the core of your personality is something
election to the governorship. afterward, he served at the united states ambassador to saudi arabiya and became a professor of middle eastern studies at the university of south carolina. he did much to promote the education engagement of young people across the state. i would like to recognize his daughter and son, as well as bill, who are here with the audience today. thank you. our speaker cate edwards also exemplifies the values of governor west. she has participated in two election campaigns for her father, john edwards treat she has experienced civil engagement in multiple ways, but and directorship of a foundation in her mother's honor, works to educate and empower low-income youth to mr. shipp, education, and service opportunities. in her spare time, she graduated from honors from princeton, earning a political economics degree. she earned a law degree from harvard in 2009. she clerked for federal judge and washed at a washington firm specializing in civil rights cases. she is now a partner in a law firm, specializes in civil rights and labor law cases. in 2011, she got marrie
, if the world, if the united states would just give -- would create a no-fly zone or allow the rebels to have rockets, he said that the war here that's claimed so many lives and killed so -- and caused so many people to be on the run, would end in two days, andrea? >> and ann, one of the people -- one of the refugees whom you spoke to, was a displaced woman named hoda. talk to me about her. it was a commelling interview -- compelling interview. >> she's one of about a million people who are basically living on the run inside syria, about half of them according to the united nations children, and she's living in a tent. she had just arrived that day. she arrived because her son was hurt in an aerial strike. he was wounded on his head and also in his leg. he had gotten some hospital care, but he was recovering in this tent and she was very upset. she was crying and saying, you know, essentially to the pilot of the plane, do you not have children? you know, and to president bashar assad, do you not -- do you want to see your children suffering in the way that is -- my son is suffering. she was v
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